SERIES – A new detective series has appeared. Les Invisibles, whose trailer can be seen at the top of the article, will be broadcast from this Wednesday, September 8 at 9:05 p.m. on France 2. Composed of six 52-minute episodes and produced by Storia Productions in collaboration with France Télévisions, the program was designed by novelist Olivier Norek and jointly produced by Chris Briant and Axelle Laffont.

The initial idea is simple: a brigade on the fringes (whose offices are located in the archives), tasked with dealing with unidentified victims of crime, has seven days to find their identity. If they do not succeed, the remains are then deposited in the ward of the destitute, more vulgarly called the mass grave. A scenario that Commander Darius (Guillaume Cramoisan) and his team made up of Marijo (Nathalie Cerda), Ben (Quentin Faure), Duchess (Déborah Krey) and the lawyer Angie (Cécile Rebboah) want to avoid at all costs. The group has only one goal, to restore dignity to the deceased.

As its synopsis shows, the series is innovative in its approach to the detective genre. Exit the pattern of classic investigations, place to another way of staging crime cases. While in most programs like this it is the culprit who is the center of attention, this time it is the victim.

Each episode (independent of each other) follows the same plot, we do not know the identity of the deceased and it is only at the end that we discover it, by tracing his story alongside the investigators.

If the culprit no longer occupies a preponderant place, his motivations, his act, are no less important. So that’s the whole point of the series’ narration: two stories are thus developed in parallel. That of the investigation, of course, but also that of the culprit, whose journey we are following. “We wanted to find a way to make this series more human and more engaging,” Patrick Tringale, one of the writers of The Invisibles, told HuffPost.

If the latter recognizes that this “double point of view” is quite unconventional in series of the genre, it was necessary in order to bring something new according to him. “They have muddied the waters with this double narration”, observes Guillaume Cramoisan, seen in particular in Profiling on TF1. “The two stories are moving at the same speed and yet they are indeed two different axes. There is a particular look at the culprits. It was very interesting, ”continues the actor, won over by the format.

He is joined by Nathalie Cerda (Irresponsible): “We wanted it to happen a bit like that. We know who committed the crime but how will it be resolved? I liked it when I read the script ”.

However, there was no question of completely setting aside the “codes” which are the salt of French police programs. Clearly, the series is no exception to the classic “procedural” of all thrillers, but it sees further. “There are obligatory passages like the crime scene or the autopsy. But we wanted to avoid all the usual clichés. It’s boring to write and shoot, ”says Patrick Tringale. As proof, there is no indoor interrogation scene in the program.

Give back a story to the victims, associate it with that of the culprits: by its form, Les Invisibles therefore puts on a more sentimental, more human side, which is reminiscent of the famous Cold Case series: Classified cases. From there to see any influence there? Not really for the screenwriter, who still admits some similarities in the construction of the story.

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