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October 28, 2021

by Lina Tran, NASA

The sun emitted a significant solar flare on October 28, 2021 at 11:35 a.m. EDT. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, which is constantly observing the sun, captured a picture of the event.

Solar flares are strong bursts of radiation. The harmful radiation from a flare cannot penetrate the Earth’s atmosphere to physically affect people on the ground, but – if intense enough – it can disrupt the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communication signals are transmitted.

The X class denotes the most intense flares, while the number gives more information about their strength. An X2 is twice as intense as an X1, an X3 is three times as intense, and so on. Flares classified as X10 or greater are considered unusually intense.

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Ref: https://phys.org