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July 26, 2021

Croatia’s plan to put famous inventor Nikola Tesla on its euro coins has sparked criticism in Serbia, whose central bank announced on Monday that it would bring the issue to the EU.

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Tesla, an ethnic Serb born in what is now Croatia in 1856 when the country was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, is a source of pride in both countries whose relations have been frosty since the bloody collapse of Yugoslavia in the 1990s

Croatia has yet to introduce the euro in the country and plans to do so in 2023.

In a statement to AFP, the Serbian National Bank (NBS) said that putting Tesla on the coins was “inappropriate”.

It would mean “usurping the cultural and scientific heritage of the Serbian people” as Tesla identified himself as a Serb, it said.

“Appropriate action with EU institutions” will be taken if this eventually happens, he added without further explanation.

The plan has sparked a debate on social media between those who accuse Zagreb of “stealing Tesla” and those who argue that it “belongs to the world “.

He ve He spent most of his professional career in the United States and eventually became a naturalized American.

Tesla has patented more than 700 inventions in his life, including wireless communications, remote control, and fluorescent lighting.

Although he did the cover in 1931 of Time magazine, Tesla died 12 years later at the age of 86 alone in a New York hotel.

However, his name became internationally known after Elon Musk named his electric car company after him.

© 2021 AFP

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