MANILA, Philippines – The National Kidney and Transplant Institute (NKTI) in Quezon City announced that the delivery of remdesivir and tocilizumab to COVID-19 patients outside the hospital has been temporarily suspended due to critical care.

“Our stock levels are already critical and we haven’t received any stock from the supplier,” said NKTI Director Rose Marie Liquete in an interview with CNN Philippines on Tuesday.

According to Liquete, the hospital currently has 115 COVID-positive patients, from most of whom are severe to critical patients and more than half are on dialysis.

“In a few days it won’t be enough because we are getting more every day, last week 100 mg long, 107, today we have 115. If you calculate the [needs] of each patient who is severe to critical, ubos lahat yun (nothing is left), “said Liquete.

” For example, if we take the stock of Tociliz within this week umab not got, wala na ‘yan (nothing will be left), “she added.

NKTI had previously also announced that it would stop issuing hemoperfusion cartridges to non-NKTI patients as their supply of these cartridges is also limited is.

You can find more news about the novel coronavirus here.
What you need to know about Corona.

For more information on COVID-19, call the DOH hotline: (02) 86517800 local 1149/1150.

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Ref: https://newsinfo.inquirer.net