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By Orlando Whitehead

This Sunday October 31st is the first day of the United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26), when delegates from nearly 200 countries come together in Glasgow to discuss global greenhouse gas emission reductions and the Avoiding Climate Change.

From today through Friday, November 12, the summit will be the focus of media attention as world leaders make decisions that will affect future generations. In addition to heads of state, around 25,000 helpers and officials will be present and a series of intensive discussions will take place in the coming days.

Although this has been branded as a crucial moment in global climate policy, many are skeptical of whether there will be any concrete results. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who is hosting the event, could only muster symbolic optimism on the matter. “

And since all of the previous 25 major international climate conferences have failed to satisfy the global appetite for fossil fuels, the precedent for pessimism is clear.

To that end, many grassroots movements of climate activists are upset by the bombastic” blah blah blah. ” “The world leader whose hollow creeds are quickly identified as hot air and posturing. The acute lack of political will to seriously address climate change has already led to climate protests around the world, and although expectations for the success of COP26 are low, thousands of activists see the conference as an opportunity to attract media attention and spreading their message around the world.

In addition to crowds of delegates, activists from the UK, Europe and beyond have come to Glasgow to hold world leaders accountable and hold their own discussions in parallel with the official schedule. The organizers are expecting huge demonstrations and predict that over 100,000 supporters will gather next Friday.

A group of grandparents from Belgium traveled to Glasgow by train and on foot. One of the groups, Dirk Van Esbroeck, told AFP: “We are waiting for more ambitious action and want political leaders to be aware of the urgency of the situation for our children and grandchildren. You will live in a very difficult world that is being shaken by climate change. ”

Van Esbroeck spoke of the gap that needs to be bridged between declarations and actions:“ There is a big step to be taken between word and deed. ”

Others have also traveled extensively to show their commitment to a greener future. Becky Stockes is a 31 year old translator who came to Glasgow from Spain. In an interview with AFP, she said that the climate talks were “one last chance to take concrete action”.

Time is actually running out as climate crises occur more frequently and world temperatures rise. Nasa noted that 2020 is the hottest year on record; the ten hottest years all fell between 2005 and 2021.

The planet is now over 1.1 ° C hotter than pre-industrial levels and this is increasing exponentially. Since the 2015 Paris Agreement, the goal has been to limit global warming to 1.5 ° C by the end of the century. We are currently on course at at least 2.7 ° C.

The event will also be attended by 10,000 police officers from across the UK. According to the Scottish Police, this is the largest law-and-order operation in Scotland to date.

Ref: https://www.brusselstimes.com